Britain to celebrate 100th anniversary of women winning right to vote

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Seven areas across England are to host projects in 2018 to mark 100 years since women in Britain were first allowed to vote, Minister for Women and Equalities Anne Milton announced Friday.

To mark the milestone event the government’s “centenary cities” — Bolton, Bristol, Leeds, Leicester, London, Manchester and Nottingham — will all stage a range of exciting projects to celebrate as well as remember the individuals who helped win votes for women.

And government funding of 1.6 million U.S. dollars will help pay for the celebrations.
The program forms part of the government’s wider plans to promote this pivotal moment in history, including the addition of the first female statue in Parliament Square of suffragist campaigner Millicent Fawcett, due to be unveiled in 2018.

“The initiatives and commemorations that will take place across the country next year aim to help inspire and educate young people about UK democracy and its importance, as well as encourage more women to get into political and public life,” said a spokeswoman for the Department for Education.

Although women in Britain won the right to vote in 1918, it was not the end of the campaign. Only females aged 30 or over were allowed to vote. It would be another decade before women won equality with men and were allowed to vote at 21. The age for both sexes has since been lowered to 18.

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