History buffs give Leicester tourism boost

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Confirmation the remains were of King Richard III came from experts from the University of Leicester who analysed DNA from the bones and found they matched that of descendants of the monarch's family.

LEICESTER is expecting another bumper year, as history buffs continue flock into the city.

The main attraction is the skeleton of King Richard III, slain during the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, which was unearthed during an excavation of a car park in Leicester in 2013.

Even the ordinary looking council-run car park where the skeleton was found is now a protected site. Last month Historic England recommended that protection status should be granted to what it described as one of the most important sites in the country’s national history.

John Glen, parliamentary under secretary of state for arts, heritage and tourism said: “The discovery of Richard III’s skeleton was an extraordinary archaeological find and an incredible moment in British history. By protecting this site as a scheduled monument, we are ensuring that the remains of this once lost medieval friary buried under Leicester are preserved for future generations.”

Confirmation the remains were of King Richard III came from experts from the University of Leicester who analysed DNA from the bones and found they matched that of descendants of the monarch’s family.

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