New rules for dive operators on the iconic Great Barrier Reef

Queensland has the largest recreational snorkelling and diving sector in Australia

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Under the new rules, vessels are required to carry automatic external defibrillators and ensure instructors are well positioned to render assistance in the case of an emergency.

After 10 tourists died during a six month period at the end 2016, the Queensland State Government in Australia has set about tightening regulations for dive operators on the iconic Great Barrier Reef.

Now, after more than one year of consultations, the snorkeling and scuba code of practice has now come into force, with an array of new safety measures to improve one of the state’s favourite recreational activities.

Under the new rules, vessels are required to carry automatic external defibrillators and ensure instructors are well positioned to render assistance in the case of an emergency.

Operators have also been made to enhance supervision and implement better systems to identify “at-risk snorkelers” prior to them entering the water.

With 175 snorkelling deaths in Australia over the last 13 years,  member of parliament Craig Crawford said it’s imperative visitors that contribute to the local economy be kept safe on the reef.

The Great Barrier Reef is the world’s largest coral reef system composed of over 2,900 individual reefs and 900 islands stretching for over 2,300 kilometres (1,400 mi) over an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (133,000 sq mi). The reef is located in the Coral Sea, off the coast of Queensland, Australia.

Read More about the Reef:

Great Barrier Reef | Australia’s Great Natural Wonder

The iconic Great Barrier Reef is blessed with the breathtaking beauty of the world’s largest coral reef. Learn more about Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.

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