Famed temple in Turkey opens after conservation works

Gobekli Tepe, Turkish for "Potbelly Hill," was located in a region where tourism has suffered serious decline because of the conflict in neighboring Syria.

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As the oldest known human-made religious structure, the site was declared a first-degree protection area in 2015, with an official inauguration scheduled for mid-April.
As the oldest known human-made religious structure, the site was declared a first-degree protection area in 2015, with an official inauguration scheduled for mid-April.

TRAVEL GAZETTE –  Gobekli Tepe, thought to be the world’s oldest temple area, has reopened after one and a half years of urgent conservation works.

The site was first noted in a survey conducted by Istanbul University and the University of Chicago in 1963 and is expected to be included on the UNESCO Permanent List this year.

Located in the southeastern province of Sanliurfa, the Neolithic-age settlement, which was built roughly 12,000 years old ago, well before the Egyptian pyramids, has been undergoing archaeological excavations since 1995.

As the oldest known human-made religious structure, the site was declared a first-degree protection area in 2015, with an official inauguration scheduled for mid-April.

Gobekli Tepe, Turkish for “Potbelly Hill,” was located in a region where tourism has suffered serious decline because of the conflict in neighboring Syria.

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